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The Washington Post

Having a little work done: Now as routine as ‘eating kale and going to spin class’

The modern war against aging — against tiny furrows, laugh lines and muffin tops — will be bloodless.

Now, we’re microneedling, subjecting our jowls to the prick of a hundred pins in the hopes that this will prod our collagen to flow the way it did when we were 25. We’re basking in the clarifying glow of intense pulsed light and letting ultrasounds wash over our chubby parts. (Prominent exception to the bloodless rule: The “vampire facelift,” the grotesque Kardashian-endorsed fad that pumps your own platelets back into you: That is basically all blood.)

No longer will we be nipping, sucking and tucking at 60. Not when we middle-income, yoga-loving Americans could be filling, peeling and “sub-dermal heating” at 35.

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Elle

Her medical colleagues may have nicknamed her Queen of Lasers, but with more than 300 published articles and eight textbooks on light-based therapies to her credit, Tina Alster, MD, a clinical professor of dermatology at the Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, DC, more than lives up to the title.

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Allure

They are the beautifiers behind the beautiful people: The designer who makes Sarah Jessica's entrance, the facialist who gets Gisele to glow, and the trainer who kicks J.Lo's butt. Now they reveal their best tricks.

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Washingtonian

Ever since Dr. Tina Alster moved from Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Washington to practice laser surgery in 1991, patients have come to her office to have scars removed, tattoos erased, and birthmarks vaporized. But now, as the power of lasers has become more predictable and accurate, she has started seeing a new class of patients who view the laser as a tool they can use to fight signs of aging without going under a surgeon's knife.

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New York Times

I dimly recall a time when women talked about books, plays and politics. Now all we talk about is skin. In the old days, there wer two ways to curate your skin: Noxzema or Pond's. Now there are ways beyond number to mortify aging flesh: cutaneous laser resurfacing, ultrasound liposuction, acid and chemical peels, $80 one-ounce vials of Cellex-C High Potency Serum (less imposingly know as vitamin C). I went to talk to the reigning deity of dermatology: Washington's Tina Alster a.k.a. the Laser Queen... Dr. Alster, the author of "Cosmetic Laser Surgery," is a glamorous blonde in Chanel whose motto is "Natural, schmatural." "In D.C., everybody wants to be a natural beauty," she says.

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Town & Country

Two blocks from the White House, a high-powered dermatologist and her young colleague are targeting the aesthetic needs of an unexpected demographic: men.

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Cosmopolitan

Your Clearest Skin Starts Now. The secret to banishing a breakout? Depends on how much time you have.

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DC Modern Luxury

While Dr. Tina Alster may be known for enhancing the faces of DC's most fabulous women, her practice also has a focus on grooming-focused men. Alster runs W for Men, in conjunction with her Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, which caters primarily to DC gents in search of the fountain of youth.

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Women’s Health

Freezing vs. Injecting a Double Chin You can't exercise away a waddle. Two new work-arounds tackle the tough spot for noticeable (permanent) results, and neither is as invasive as lipo. Dr. Rebecca Kazin shares options that may be right for you.

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Town & Country

NEW WAVE: Who says heavier creams do it better? Making the case for light-as-air products that deliver lasting results Ask any actress or social media star her number one beauty secret and chances are it will be that she drinks tons of ‪#‎water‬ - oceanfuls, she swears! But truth must be told: A few liters of Fiji do not lead to perfectly hydrated skin. "Unless you're trekking through the Sahara and are severely dehydrated, it's bogus," says Dr. Tina Alster. She prefers topical moisturizers to counteract dehydration, which can happen to any skin type (even oily).